Thursday, June 11, 2009

word combinations I don't want to hear again #1

Daddy date.

16 comments:

  1. And those in the crowd said "amen"...

    How are your buddy children?

    ReplyDelete
  2. What the? What is a "Daddy date"? Is that when mum and dad have a night without the kids or when kids get to be with the other parent (so could equally be "Mummy date"?

    ReplyDelete
  3. If you don't know, L, stay ignorant.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Couldn't help myself - looked it up. One person's blog had a sweet and innocent theme (when she has work to do at night, he takes the kids for a DD night). But yes, just looking at the rest of the short blurbs that come up with a Google search...

    ReplyDelete
  5. I suspect she's referring to the fact that Mark Driscoll treats "daddy dates" as essentially compulsory parenting tools for daughters.

    I haven't done the googling - but I wonder if the results are perhaps more sinister.

    ReplyDelete
  6. aww, sad. I have just started using this term. yeah, i got it from driscoll. now i will use it more. out of spite.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Who is the spite directed at?

    ReplyDelete
  8. mostly simone, but whoever wants some

    ReplyDelete
  9. I like the term. But I like Driscoll too, so maybe the fact that I like it doesn't count ;)

    Yeah, it's naff, a tad perscriptive and American, but isn't it essentially describing a good thing? And isn't that what counts?

    ReplyDelete
  10. I like Driscoll too - I just dread his children growing up and leaving the faith after he's held his own parenting in such high esteem - it appears a little too early to be banking on success there.

    I'd prefer him to have some runs on the board before talking up his parenting methodologies.

    I also don't get why he calls his sons "buddy"... that may just be an Americanism.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm not keen on Driscoll (sorry, folks!) and I'm with Simone on the term. I think dates are for wives, not daughters, and I think that's an important distinction to maintain! (And I don't say that with anything nasty in mind, I'm just talking about healthy family dynamics).

    ReplyDelete
  12. I think the problem here is that the word "date" has become synonymous with "romance" in western culture. Now we have terms such as "play date" for two or more children to play together on a date mutually convenient for the parents. In some ways this is a reclamation of the original function of the word "date" to simply mean a day in one's diary / when an event occurs.

    On that basis I have no problem with the term "Daddy date". The only problem I have with it is that it conjures up an image of a father who is otherwise uninvolved in the lives of his children.

    ReplyDelete
  13. That's a good point about 'play dates', Laetitia. But I'd be very surprised if Mark Driscoll describes his time with his sons as 'Daddy dates'. If he does, then I've much less problem with him using the term with his daugher(s)!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Ah, I think I'm beginning to see the problem. Maybe he would call them "Dad dates". Along that line I find "mummy" and "daddy" a bit odd coming from anyone past pubescence but it works for some families.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I like Laetitia's point about it just being a time in the diary.

    I kind of am rolling my eyes a bit at some of these comments, because it feels a bit like criticising someone for no real reason, and someone who is doing good stuff and trying to set a good example.

    Maybe it needs less dissection and should just be seen as a bloke encouraging other blokes to set time to spend alone with their daughters. Not a bad thing.

    The guy has faults, but don't we all, and if I was in the limelight like him I am sure I would have way more to be criticised about.

    ReplyDelete
  16. It's just one of those things that fails the cultural translation. If he called it "quality time with his daughters to make sure they don't go looking for quality time with guys you don't want them dating" then that would have less "bleh" factor... but it's infinitely less marketable.

    The "daddy" thing is weird. As is the "pappa-daddy" thing, and the "buddy" thing. But it's not doctrinally weird - so I can cope.

    But I agree with Simone. I could do without hearing it again.

    ReplyDelete